It’s a question of the frontline

In the first of a series of blogs, Vic Citarella considers the crucial role of the workforce in Fulfilling Lives for people with multiple and complex needs. Vic is keen to start a dialogue with projects on this topic. You can get in touch with him using the details below.

“The CFE and University of Sheffield 2nd annual report into the national evaluation of Fulfilling Lives: Supporting people with multiple needs programme has chapters on ‘interventions and approaches’ and on ‘working the frontline’. The report says it raises as many questions as it answers but without doubt it pinpoints the workforce and what they do as the mission critical factor in the projects. More is promised by way of research and future evaluation. That means, among other things, dialogue with the practitioners, the managers, the stakeholders and the customers of the services.

What better way to exchange views than by identifying some themes in a Blog? Read in full here

Social care work – at the butt end of downward mobility

Vic Citarella postulates that investment in the social care workforce will improve social mobility

One factor that contributes to divisions or unity between people is the nature of the labour market. Work features large in how we see ourselves and how others see us and our families. It is integral to our identity. It is about the pay-off from hard work that politicians talk of when they use the language of social mobility. They usually mean better paid and more secure jobs lead to the ‘good things’ in life. It is those jobs that enable mobility and which, for politicians, can only go one way – upwards. When people identify themselves as downwardly mobile, it is then that they get angry and lash out at governments, officialdom, the establishment, outsiders and eventually each other. When a majority of people who perceive themselves as downwardly mobile are given any plebiscite the result is predictable. In the case of the referendum on membership of the EU an outcome exacerbated by the perceived comparative upward mobility of many immigrant workers. Read more…

A Major Oxymoron

Vic Citarella remembers the days before there was social care

Listening to former premier John Major sounding off about Europe on TV this week prompted a memory – one that could be completely incorrect, but nonetheless its mine. The recollection being that he was credited to be the first senior politician to publicly use the term ‘social care’ back in the 1980s. Anyway this was what was said back then amongst those promoting the standing of residential, day and domiciliary care workers. Those arguing for investment in status, training and recognition and the professionalisation of social care as distinct from social work. Read More

Lessons will be learned

Margaret Flynn and Vic Citarella – authors of the Winterbourne View Hospital serious case review – reflect on what has followed the screening of the BBC Panorama Undercover Care: the Abuse Exposed five years ago in May 2011.

The serious case review was published by the South Gloucestershire Safeguarding Adults Board in August 2012. In response to the findings and recommendations, politicians asserted that lessons will be learned and that they would set in train a number of continuing efforts to ‘transform’ services.[1] It was apt that they should deploy such terminology since, for us, the lessons have been stark....read more

[1] https://www.england.nhs.uk/learningdisabilities/care/ accessed 26th May 2016

CPEA Nose guest blog: Cults and Brain Washing

yoga-pose-1082172_1920

As a psycho/hypnotherapist and meditator for well over 30 years, I have often shown people how to use ‘altered states’ to help them manage, and indeed change, their behaviours. This allows them to become empowered and develop more successful communication skills, thus living their lives more successfully to become the best they can be…

[Read more on the CPEA Nose health, social care and children’s services blog, here]

CPEA Nose guest blog: A Rose by Any Other Name

old-peoples-home-413982_1280

I don’t know. Maybe I’m being a bit over sensitive here but I suspect anyone who reads this page will agree with me that it is wrong for a care home to change someone’s name. So why – if it’s so obviously wrong do people do it without the flicker of an eyelid?…

[Read more on the CPEA Nose health, social care and children’s services blog, here]